Brian is the editor at large of Edible East End, Edible Long Island, Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn. He writes from his home in Sag Harbor, New York, where he and his family tend a home garden and oysters. He is also obsessed with ducks, donuts and dumplings.

Road Trip: Taste L.I.’s Best Small Food Producers and Craft Beer Culture at “The Quarterly Carousal”

Calling all beer aficionados willing to hop on the LIRR for a good brew. Edible East End (the shore-based sister to this magazine) and the Brooklyn Brewery invite you to a free party at the Bellmore, Long Island craft beer bar Effin Gruven on Thursday, April 26, to celebrate the Nassau and Suffolk County rollout of the latest Brewmaster Reserve release from the brewery.

Hurtling Through Manhattan: Anne Saxelby’s Guide to Where to Eat in the Lower East Side

Since Anne Saxelby first opened her eponymous stall in the Essex Street Market in 2006–essentially redefining American cheese–she’s taken strolls or bike-rides around and down all the crooked streets that define this part of Lower Manhattan, which sits in the shadow of the Williamsburg Bridge. Consider it her way of meeting her neighbors, and soaking up the diversity, edible and otherwise, that still haunts this nabe.

More Good Food Jobs Than You Can Imagine (or Five Tips for Job Seekers from the Just Food Conference)

We’ve been making the rounds of winter farming conferences in the region–from NOFA to PASA–and we just got back from the most urban of these, Just Food’s 2012 conference at the High School of Food and Finance in Hell’s Kitchen, which included a job fair organized by Good Food Jobs and workshops advising on how to start a career as a farmer, raise money for your food startup, or launch your food-related nonprofit.

Happy Ducks, Obsolete Root Cellars, and Other Signs of the Warmest January on Record

I’ve been thumbing through the short, final chapters of Joan Gussow’s most recent book, Growing, Older. They’re humorous even if the themes include dying, lifelong regrets, sea level rise and climate change. The later geological preoccupations are shared by both of us—we both garden in floodprone areas—and the balmy, 60-degree afternoons this past weekend reminded me that the future-oriented predictions of climate scientists seem more and more to have arrived in the here and now. (And, my colleagues at Edible Brooklyn tell me, the annual winter festival at Prospect Park was just cancelled, due to weather too warm to make snow.)

Slow Wine Launches Its Cross-Country Tour in Manhattan

For two decades the international movement to preserve taste called Slow Food has produced a guide to Italian wine in conjunction with Gambero Rosso– an Italian Zagat that puts out food and wine guides and produces massive wine tastings around the world. Now, to encourage a new era of sustainabile wine sipping , Slow Food has rolled out a wine classification system and bringing it to America for the first time, along with a sampling of Italian Slow Wine-designated producers that will visit New York on January 30. (Get your tickets here.)

It’s the Real Best-Ofs; Vote for Your Edible Local Hero By Friday

As the New Year approaches, with its cavalcade of “best of” and “top 10” lists, we invite our readers to vote in a very Edible way–for your favorite farmers, brewers, bartenders and food systems innovators as part of Edible Communities Sixth Annual Local Hero Awards. The process is already underway and ends this Friday, December 16, so nominate your favorite farmer, chef, eatery, food shop, food artisan and non-profit now.

Perfect Potato Pancake Alert: Brooklyn Latke Fest Announces Chefs/Winners

Now that we’ve tested our spud-mashing skills at Thanksgiving, it’s time for those of us celebrating Hanukah to turn our attention to the potato pancake. Specifically, the third annual Latke Festival our sister publication Edible Brooklyn is putting on with Great Performances at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on December 19th. (If you haven’t snagged your ticket here, now’s the time.)