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marie viljoen

IN OUR CURRENT ISSUE: Foraging for Burdock Stems

In our current issue, Marie Viljoen, mistress of edible weeds, waxes eloquent about the flowering stems of the burdock plant. “Those who eat burdock typically cook only the root. But the fast-growing stems are a delicious wild food. Cooked, they are a semantic and gustatory marriage of globe and Jerusalem artichokes,” she writes.

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Black Cherry Bourbon

Leave it to Marie Viljoen to inspire us to forage more. That gal is always thinking ahead. Last summer she gathered a gorgeous bounty of fruit, which she turned into the black cherry bourbon she now uses to mix cocktails in the dead of winter.

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IN OUR CURRENT ISSUE: Foraging for Autumn-Olives

In our current issue Marie Viljoen introduces us to yet another delicious and abundant invasive plant taking over the city. Autumn-olives–no relation to the green things in your martini–are exquisite to eat, with a tart sweetness somewhere between a red currant and a pie cherry.

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FROM OUR RECIPE ARCHIVES: Autumn-Olive Jam

From August to early November, autumn-olive trees around the city are loaded with red currant-like berries, easily identifiable by their silver-stippled skins. In our current issue, Marie Viljoen shares tips for where to find the trees, when to taste the berries and how to turn the sweetly tart fruit into luscious autumn-olive jam.

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IN OUR CURRENT ISSUE: Foraging for Urban Pigweed

In our latest issue, Marie Viljoen shares her tips for foraging for and dining on pigweed–a hearty weed once cultivated by the Aztecs for its precious seeds that now takes over the city come summer time. From sautéed atop crostini to baked in a pigweed tart, Viljoen offers several ways to enjoy the nutritious leaves.

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IN OUR CURRENT ISSUE: Foraging for Urban Day Lilies

In our latest issue, Marie Viljoen shares her tips for foraging for and dining on day lilies–an invasive species blooming all over the city right now. She recommends them raw in salads, steamed with a dab of butter and salt, gently pickled or dried and added to soups.

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