Hop on the Brew Trail

While you probably have your spot staked out and your cooler stocked with your fave sudsy treats for tonight’s firework festivities, this weekend head north on a pilgrimage of the liquidy sort to brew-happy Central New York.

2010-08-18-mg-hops4jpg-5e521342becfefdc_largeWhile you probably have your spot staked out and your cooler stocked with your fave sudsy treats for tonight’s firework festivities, you may well have forgotten all about planning something for this weekend. Consider heading north on a pilgrimage of the liquidy sort to Central New York, where you can check out over 30 breweries, brew pubs, tap-happy watering holes, and cideries in and around the great city of Syracuse.

Once upon a time a hundred or so years ago, greater Binghamton, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Otsego and Schoharie counties were the hoppin’ hop capital of the country, believe it or not, to the tune of 3 million pounds annually by the mid-nineteenth century. But by the early twentieth, blight, bugs, and booze-shunning (e.g., Prohibition) put the hops industry out of business in New York state. Over the last couple of decades, though, a multitude of beer-happy haunts have popped up here and, thanks to the organization Brew Central, are accessible via a great, new, sippin’-centric website to help you grab the whole Omme-gang (see what we did there? Beer humor!) and plan out an edible escape of the sudsy kind. Cheers!

Newsletter

Categories

Tags

Amy Zavatto is the daughter of an old school Italian butcher who used to sell bay scallops alongside steaks, and is also the former Deputy Editor of Edible Brooklyn and Edible Manhattan. She holds her Level III Certification in Wine and Spirits from the WSET, and contributes to Imbibe, Whisky Advocate, SOMMJournal, Liquor.com, and others. She is the author of Forager's Cocktails: Botanical Mixology with Fresh, Natural Ingredients and The Architecture of the Cocktail. She's stomped around vineyards from the Finger Lakes to the Loire Valley and toured distilleries everywhere from Kentucky to Jalisco to the Highlands of Scotland. When not doing all those other things, Amy is the Director of the Long Island Merlot Alliance.