Girl Scouts Score a Locavore Badge, We Can Only Hope Brownies Will Too

Thanks to the fine blog The Food Section for alerting us to the fact that the Girl Scouts added a locavore badge earlier this month. (It looks a lot like our very own business card, which maybe isn’t surprising.) According to a piece in USA Today, the badges are the first major upgrade since 1987 and a part of a modernizing of the group as they get ready for next year’s 100-year-anniversary. Though as Josh Friedland of The Food Section points out, like adult locavores, the scouts are going back in time as much as they’re going forward.

A new badge for the girls in green.

Thanks to the fine blog The Food Section for alerting us to the fact that the Girl Scouts added a locavore badge earlier this month. (It looks a lot like our very own business card, which maybe isn’t surprising.)

According to a piece in USA Today, the badges are the first major upgrade since 1987 and a part of a modernizing of the group as they get ready for next year’s 100-year-anniversary. (The fashion, fitness and makeup badge becomes science of style, etc., badges on financial literacy and digital movie making have also been added.) Though as Josh Friedland of The Food Section points out, like adult locavores, the scouts are going back in time as much as they’re going forward. The locavore badge, which is available to senior scouts, might enable them to connect with long-gone badges like canner, farmer, beekeeper and dairy maid.

We also notice that the path to achieving the badge, as noted in The Food Section story, is also pretty similar to our own Eat Drink Local Challenge, which we put out each year. Maybe we could work with some local troops to help a few young women earn the best badge of all. Okay, that’s actually the canoeing badge, which still sits proudly on our own sash from Troop 222 hanging somewhere in our parents’ basement.

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Rachel Wharton is the editor of Edible Brooklyn. She won a 2010 James Beard food journalism award, holds a master’s degree in Food Studies from New York University, and has more than 15 years of experience as a writer, editor and reporter. A North Carolina native and a former features food reporter for the New York Daily News, she edited the Edible Brooklyn cookbook and was the co-author of both Handheld Pies and DiPalo's Guide to the Essential Foods of Italy. Her work also appears in publications such as The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and Saveur.