Momofuku Midnight Chicken Club

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Momofuku Midnight Fried Chicken Dinner Attendees Captured as They Knaw Away

This weekend one of my favorite fellow food writers (Keith Wagstaff, of Citysearch and The Feedbag) organized a midnight trip to Momofuku Noodle Bar for their now famous $100 fried chicken dinner. I’ll admit, I too was at first aghast by the price tag: The words “$100 fried chicken dinner” do not ring of recession pricing or budget-friendly spending tactics, even if it is fried chicken from David Chang, who to date has not made anything I didn’t immediately want more of, with the exception of one cereal-flavored cone of soft serve I couldn’t finish. (Or maybe that’s just because I’d already eaten a cup of the one that tastes like banana pudding?) Anyway, the price is actually pretty reasonable, because you can bring between four to eight people to your $100 fried chicken dinner, and it easily feeds eight.

So for about $12.50 (before tax, tip, beer and the requisite Chang pork belly bun) you get a platter topped with two enormous piles of enormous pieces–-like those big breasted commercially raised birds, almost, but way better tasting and sustainably raised for sure–of superjuicy fried chicken, one side done southern style with Old Bay, the other Korean style with sticky sweet spicy sauce and sesame seeds. Plus Chinese pancakes and butter lettuce leaves for rolling the meat into sandwiches, if you don’t just knaw it off the bone, plus radishes, carrots, basil, shisho leaves, chiles, lemon basil and four dipping sauces.

Like I said, all this easily feeds eight at midnight on Saturday, especially if you’re Keith and decided it would be wise to eat a bacon-wrapped, mayo and avocado-topped Chihuahua Crif dog two hours before arriving.

Rachel Wharton

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Rachel Wharton is the former deputy editor of Edible Brooklyn and Edible Manhattan. She won a 2010 James Beard food journalism award, holds a master’s degree in Food Studies from New York University, and has more than 15 years of experience as a writer, editor and reporter. A North Carolina native and a former features food reporter for the New York Daily News, she edited the Edible Brooklyn cookbook and was the co-author of both Handheld Pies and DiPalo's Guide to the Essential Foods of Italy. Her work also appears in publications such as The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and Saveur.