Gardens

SNAP Gardens

SNAP Gardens Puts Food Stamps to Better Use

In our latest issue, Ann Monroe profiles Daniel Bowman Simon, a young entrepreneur who discovered a 1973 provision in the food stamp legislation that no one knew about–literally only one other person had ever heard of it– which said that food stamps could also be spent seeds and plants.

Last Call–The “Art Pack” Heirloom Seed Exhibit at the Hort

Each year the Hudson Valley Seed Library commissions New York State artists to design the packaging for a special line of heirloom seeds called Art Packs. Until March 2, you can see the packs next to the original works–and buy both the seeds and reprints of the art–at the Horticultural Society of New York on West 37th Street. If you do miss it, don’t worry–you can get a glimpse of the 23 packs and the 23 works of art on our most recent NY1 segment. Watch it right here.

Announcing our Annual “Local Heroes:” The Cheesemongers, Farmers, Chefs and Activists We Appreciate

A few months back each Edible publication around the country asked their readers to tell them about their favorite local heroes–the farmer who raises the most perfect ruby radishes and pastured pigs; the chef who rocks not just the kitchen but a sense of community; the non-profit that’s changing the way people eat in parts of the borough that need it most; the cheesemonger with a heart of gold and even better Gouda.

Art of the Heirloom at the Horticultural Society of New York Opens Tonight

Even if you have brown thumbs and prefer concrete to cultivation, we’re going to bet you’ll agree the 23 heirloom seed packets commissioned by the Hudson Valley Seed Library are real beauties. Starting tonight their Art Packs will be on display until March 2 at The Horticultural Society of New York at 148 West 37th Street in an exhibit called the Art of the Heirloom. (There’s a preview talk from 6 to 8 pm tonight, to attend, RSVP in the comments of this page.)

Carrot Top Pesto: Yet Another Reason (and Recipe) to Grow Your Own

We like to pride ourselves on using up every bit of a plant, gobbling up everything to young radish leaves, to pickled Swiss chard stems (a tip we learned from Michael Anthony at Gramercy Tavern) to the fresh roots of green garlic (that one was from Shea Gallante, of Ciano). But until we went with NY1 to The Bronx to visit Toby Adams, the manager of the 1.5-acre Ruth Rae Howell Family Garden at the New York Botanical Garden, we didn’t know that you could actually eat the tops of carrots.