Farms

Announcing our Annual “Local Heroes:” The Cheesemongers, Farmers, Chefs and Activists We Appreciate

A few months back each Edible publication around the country asked their readers to tell them about their favorite local heroes–the farmer who raises the most perfect ruby radishes and pastured pigs; the chef who rocks not just the kitchen but a sense of community; the non-profit that’s changing the way people eat in parts of the borough that need it most; the cheesemonger with a heart of gold and even better Gouda.

From Queens, A New Farmstand in Morningside Heights

Good news for Morningside Heights: Michael Grady Roberson, the former farmer of Queens County Farm Museum (you can read about him in Edible Queens) has started selling at the Sunday Columbia Greenmarket on Broadway and W.115th Street, right outside the gates of Columbia University.

Art of the Heirloom at the Horticultural Society of New York Opens Tonight

Even if you have brown thumbs and prefer concrete to cultivation, we’re going to bet you’ll agree the 23 heirloom seed packets commissioned by the Hudson Valley Seed Library are real beauties. Starting tonight their Art Packs will be on display until March 2 at The Horticultural Society of New York at 148 West 37th Street in an exhibit called the Art of the Heirloom. (There’s a preview talk from 6 to 8 pm tonight, to attend, RSVP in the comments of this page.)

The Processed Food We’re Proud to Eat

It might not be the most bitter winter in recent memory, but in February fresh produce is still pretty scarce even when it’s 62. So in recent weeks we’ve been happily guzzling a slew of picked-in-summer-and-minimally-processed local produce products like this tomato juice from Migliorelli Farm. (So good we couldn’t even keep it long enough to take a photo.) The Tivoli, N.Y. grower–find them at dozens of Greenmarkets citywide–also has tomato sauces (three for $15 last time we went by) and frozen vegetables like kale, corn, mustard greens and Brussels sprouts.

Happy Ducks, Obsolete Root Cellars, and Other Signs of the Warmest January on Record

I’ve been thumbing through the short, final chapters of Joan Gussow’s most recent book, Growing, Older. They’re humorous even if the themes include dying, lifelong regrets, sea level rise and climate change. The later geological preoccupations are shared by both of us—we both garden in floodprone areas—and the balmy, 60-degree afternoons this past weekend reminded me that the future-oriented predictions of climate scientists seem more and more to have arrived in the here and now. (And, my colleagues at Edible Brooklyn tell me, the annual winter festival at Prospect Park was just cancelled, due to weather too warm to make snow.)

Doughnuts! We Forgot to Tell You About Orwasher’s Doughnuts Today on NY1

Today on our weekly NY1 television segment we visit Orwasher’s Bakery on the Upper East Side, whose 100-year-old basement brick ovens were bought by Keith Cohen in 2007. (And were profiled in the last issue of the magazine, to boot.) As you’ll see in the piece (online right here), Cohen bought the place with a vision to make true artisan breads using the best of both old-fashioned techniques and new ideas. But we forgot to tell you about his amazing jelly doughnuts.

As Hunts Point Produce Workers Prepare to Strike, We Ponder the Positives

In case you missed it in yesterday’s Daily News and on WYNC.com today, the members of Teamsters Union Local 202 are threatening a possible walkout at Hunts Point Terminal Market on January 17. According to the reports the 1,200 workers who work at the wholesale food market in the South Bronx are protesting a proposed 14 cent per hour wage increase after three years at the same pay rate.

Greenmarket Hosts its First-Ever Dance Party, a Fundraiser for Farms

In the past we’ve always worn heels to the Greenmarket’s swanky annual fundraiser–usually held at some fine hall here in Manhattan–but this time around we’re considering more practical footwear. In conjunction with Harvest Home, another non-profit group that runs farmers’ markets in the city, they’re hosting their first-ever dance party next Wednesday night, December 7th at the Bell House in Brooklyn. (It’s just a block or two from the F/R train.) Edible Brooklyn is co-sponsoring the shindig, which they’re calling the Winter Warm Up.

With Two Weeks to Go, Here’s How to Buy a Thanksgiving Turkey from the Greenmarket

Dig this helpful guide from the folks at GrowNYC, the non-profit group behind city Greenmarkets. It’s a list of which of their farmers citywide are selling turkeys, plus how to order them and where you can pick them up. Don’t forget the butchers at Dickson’s Farmstead Meats in Chelsea Market or your mail-order friends at Fleisher’s and Heritage Foods USA. (The latter will probably let you order from their new Heritage Meat Shop in Essex Market, too.)

Tapping Sap: Dream Barman William Ward on Making His Own Maple Syrup and the Cocktail it Inspired

Editor’s Note: The holiday issue of Edible Manhattan is just hitting streets as we speak, and in it we include the wonderful recipe for the Winter Warmer from William Ward, the Beverage Director at Marble Lane at Dream Downtown Hotel. A blend of rye, heated milk, Calvados and maple syrup, it’s a perfect hot drink for chilly city afternoons and even chillier evenings, a little like a session eggnog, to borrow the term for easy-drinking from the beer geeks. Better still, the cocktail was inspired by Ward’s family tradition to tap sap on his brother’s New Hampshire land each year. What follows is his own report of the experience, and his cocktail inspiration. You can also read our story, and get his recipe, right here.

No Fauxtalian Here: Led by Batali, the City’s Top Italian Chefs Cook for James Beard

On Wednesday night, at Guastavino’s under the 59th Street Bridge, we tasted the new face of Italian food in New York, like salumi from Cesare Casella of Salumeria Rosi. What tied all these dishes together wasn’t just their Old World inspiration, but their locavore sensibility: They were all made from mostly New York grown ingredients: In fact this batch of sopressatta was Casella’s first made with Empire State meat.