What Happens When is Not Just Worth a Look, But a Listen

One of the most interesting little details of What Happens When, the pop-up restaurant chef John Fraser opens this week and will change out over the next nine months, is the soundtrack. The chef is having composer Micah Silver  — his website is pleasingly called nophones.org — create a composition for each iteration of the restaurant. The current soundscape runs a little over two hours, about the time it takes to eat. It starts off with a little ambiant buzz, almost like the room is levitating, and then moves to a quieter sequence right about the time your first appetizers arrive. (Last week Silver talked about the components of the piece, including “the sounds of snow slowly covering plastic foliage brought to Walden Pond in Concord MA; recordings extracted from YouTube videos made by teenagers at rural bonfires,” and “perforations of late 19th and early 20th century wax cylinder recordings” on his website.) There’s also two special loops for each bathroom, which, if you stand in the middle of women and men, creates a “duet” and yet another mini-soundtrack. It’s one of the rare times we wish the music were actually louder at a restaurant, except for that time we couldn’t hear the Zeppelin at Roberta’s.

Newsletter

Categories

Tags

Rachel Wharton is the former deputy editor of Edible Brooklyn and Edible Manhattan. She won a 2010 James Beard food journalism award, holds a master’s degree in Food Studies from New York University, and has more than 15 years of experience as a writer, editor and reporter. A North Carolina native and a former features food reporter for the New York Daily News, she edited the Edible Brooklyn cookbook and was the co-author of both Handheld Pies and DiPalo's Guide to the Essential Foods of Italy. Her work also appears in publications such as The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and Saveur.