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Before We Lose Another Hinsch’s, Download the Project Neon App for a Tour of the City’s Coolest Signage

The recent sad news in The Brooklyn Paper that the Bay Ridge soda shoppe called Hinsch’s had shuttered reminded us of a very cool link a friend sent us a few months back to a site called Project Neon. Hinsch’s was known as much for its neon signage as its scoops of ice cream, which were still served old-school style in tiny metal trays. It’s one of the many city places cataloged by Brooklyn photographer Kirsten Hively on her Tumblr and Flickr sites. Earlier this year Hively launched a Kickstarter campaign to help develop an iPhone app to locate amazing neon signs around the city, and you can now download the results of her work, much of it food and beverage focused, right here.

Why yes, there is an app for that.

The recent sad news in The Brooklyn Paper that the Bay Ridge soda shoppe called Hinsch’s had shuttered reminded us of a very cool link a friend sent us a few months back to a site called Project Neon. (In light–get it?–of our ode to the red glow from the window of East Midtown’s Subway Inn.) Hinsch’s was known as much for its neon signage as its scoops of ice cream, which were still served old-school style in tiny metal trays. It’s one of the many city places cataloged by Brooklyn photographer Kirsten Hively on her Tumblr and Flickr sites. Earlier this year Hively launched a Kickstarter campaign to help develop an iPhone app to locate amazing neon signs around the city, and you can now download the results of her work, much of it food and beverage focused, right here. We recommend touring the boroughs with the app in hand soon, before more old signs like the one at Hinsch’s go dark for good. Better still, check out her show at City Reliquary, the tiny NYC culture museum on Manhattan Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

 

 

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Rachel Wharton is the editor of Edible Brooklyn. She won a 2010 James Beard food journalism award, holds a master’s degree in Food Studies from New York University, and has more than 15 years of experience as a writer, editor and reporter. A North Carolina native and a former features food reporter for the New York Daily News, she edited the Edible Brooklyn cookbook and was the co-author of both Handheld Pies and DiPalo's Guide to the Essential Foods of Italy. Her work also appears in publications such as The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and Saveur.